Splash of Color Yarns on sale!

I know I’ve not posted lately as I’ve been busy building my hand-dyed yarn business, Splash of Color Yarns.  I have also been design a pair of socks and an asymmetrical shawl.

I have a December sale running in my Etsy store now through December 20th at 11:59pm EST.

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A Day at the Pond Cowl

I’ve been busy starting my hand-dyed yarn business the last couple of months.  I love dyeing yarn and one of my favorite techniques is to create variegated yarns.  Of course, then that leaves one with a beautiful hank of dyed yarn and wondering what to make with it.

The end result is that I designed this new cowl pattern, A Day at the Pond, which is free on Ravelry.  It’s basically a ribbed cowl with ribs made of Estonian 3-into-3 clusters.  I knit this with a size 5 needle so it’s a drape-y type fabric but has elasticity and stretch due to the ribbed effect.

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The pattern is a simple three row repeat and is easily customized to be worked into a longer loop but the height won’t be as high.  Another option would be to cast on fewer stitches and you’ll have enough yarn out of a standard hank of sock yarn to make the cowl taller. What I love about it is that there’s enough texture in the cowl that “shows” through the variegated yarn.

If you’d like to see what yarns I’ve dyed so far, visit my other site, https://splashofcoloryarns.com.  I’m working on getting my logo updated and working on setting up an Etsy shop for selling my yarns.

Addicted or Passionate?

Did I mention that I might be “addicted” to dyeing yarn?  Well, let’s put that statement in a nicer way.  I am very passionate about yarn dyeing.  I dyed three skeins yesterday.

The first one was at 5am when I got up.  I wanted to try out Sarah Eyre’s variegated technique I learned while taking her recently published class on Craftsy called “Professional Yarn Dyeing at Home”.  Unfortunately, I didn’t have a flat roasting pan but was so eagar to dye yarn that I decided to follow the process using my tall stock pot which was a little awkward but I’m glad I had recently purchased some slant tip hair dresser bottles for dye.  It made “painting” the yarn much easier.

While I wasn’t happy at the results initially, the color has grown on me.  I had been hoping for more saturation in the colors but because the yarn wasn’t soaked first, it did soak up the dye as I’d wanted.  However, the mottled effect is actually kind of nice.  So here is my result — “Cloudy with a Chance of Rainbows”.

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Cloudy with a Chance of Rainbows

I used Jacquard acid dyes Sun Yellow, Sky Blue and Pink.

Later in the afternoon, I wanted to see what effect I would get if I soaked the yarn first.  I also used Jacquard acid dyes of Bright Kelly Green, Royal Blue, and Pink.  I believe I had too much liquid (citric acid mixture) in the dye pot because as I painted the dye on, the excess “fell through” to the bottom and swam around the yarn.  The result is some really cool color blending.  Here is “Light Peacock”.

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Light Peacock on a base of Franklin Valley Cone Yarns – Superwash

After things settled down for the evening, I was so excited about the Light Peacock yarn, I wound 256 loops around my niddy noddy using the Franklin Valley Cone yarn.  For the size of niddy noddy I have, this is approximately 400 yds/365 m.  I had to do some math to calculate the amount of dye I needed for the full skein.  Initially, I was going to simply double the dye amounts but knowing I had only used about 1/2 of my prepared green dye and only 1 oz of the prepared blue dye for the Light Peacock, I doubled the pink, reduced the green and simply used about 4 oz of the blue dye.

I am very happy at the results and the colors are more vivid.  When I “thought” I was done, I used my cotton ties to pull the yarn out and inspect it.  I found some really light areas so I simply put my dye bottle up to the yarn, and drizzled the dye onto the areas I wanted to change.  Here is Vivid Peacock.  I don’t have a twisted hank picture yet because the yarn is still drying but I wanted to share the color depth!

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Vivid Peacock on a base of Franklin Valley Cone Yarns – Superwash

So now, it’s Saturday morning and I’m debating about what set of colors I’m going to use on my next dye project!

What’s my name?

I’ve dyed a few more skeins of yarn, which I may blog about, but one of my recent color ways is yet to be named.  I’m trying to find something whimsical relating to the color of the yarn and thought “Why not ask my blog readers for assistance?”  So here goes….

The picture on the left is more the true color with the deepest turquoise at the top and right part of the hank.

We can’t have a skein of yarn unnamed!  I realize that this matches four tops I have that could use some sort of cowl or shawl which, of course, would be in my projects on Ravelry at some point.

Spring Jewel

Here are pictures of my second yarn dyeing project. I used the leftover dye from my “First Day of Spring” color way and added a green and blue Easter Egg dye pellet. I absolutely LOVE the tonal coloring in the skein.  I used the same base, Knit Picks Bare Fingering Weight yarn since I plan on using the two colors, plus a third not yet dyed, to make a shawl.

Second skein - spring Jewel

Second skein dyed – called Spring Jewel

Spring Jewel - being washed

Spring Jewel – being washed

I had very little color bleed out of the yarn as I washed it with some Soak wool wash.

Spring Jewel

Here is the yarn wound into a skein

This picture shows the yarn a tad bluer than it really is but you can see the different shading.  I am ecstatic how easy it is to turn bare yarn into something so pretty!

As I was twisting this yarn into a hank, I had my third yarn simmering away.  You’ll see that in my next post.

My first adventure in yarn dyeing!

I’ve wanted to dye some yarn for a shawl design I have in my head.  I’ve been watching YouTube videos from ChemKnits and tried to replicate the yarn in her Easter Egg pellet dyeing experiment.

I started out with a hank of yarn from KnitPicks called Bare fingering weight yarn composed of 75% Superwash Merino Wool, 25% Nylon.

What I love about this technique is seeing how the bare yarn sucks in the color.  Now, I had watched another of Rebecca’s tutorials on the differences with dyeing a loosely wound cake of yarn vs. a regular cake of yarn.  I probably should have re-wound the cake so it was looser but I kept an eye on the yarn and poked around the inside and when I saw lots of white, I let the dye soak into that section and I moved around the inside of the hank.  I also made sure that the my cake of yarn was completely submerged because I didn’t want a lot of white.  Once the yarn was cooling, I put a little clear Pyrex glass container to keep the cake submerged.

Here are the pictures of the progress.

Just submerged

Just submerged

Cooling down

Cooling down after simmering approximately 40 minutes to get most of the color in.

Niddy noddy

Beginning to wind the cool wet yarn onto my homemade niddy noddy.

Middle of the cake

Middle of the cake of yarn. I’d put a blue and purple tablet inside the cake.

Drying now

All wound up and drying

Leftover dye

Leftover dye that I’ll use to make a tonal color

Wound up

Wound up into a hank

First Day of Spring color way

I am so excited to introduce my first color way, “First Day of Spring”.

As I write this post, my second hank of yarn in a turquoise tonal color is outside on my porch in the 42 degree Fahrenheit weather, cooling down so I can wind it on my niddy noddy.  I’d told my husband that I needed another one so I could have more yarn drying at the same time.

Uh oh…..do you know what that means?

I think I’ve created a monster — I might be addicted to yarn dying!